naked art
Life and Art 
Gustav Klimt’s Field of Poppies - 1907
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Road-side flowers near Tamarama Beach in Sydney, Australia - 2012

Life and Art 

Gustav Klimt’s Field of Poppies - 1907

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Road-side flowers near Tamarama Beach in Sydney, Australia - 2012

theladybadass:

Artist Georgette Seabrooke in 1930s documentary, A Study of Negro Artists.

(via allblack-arteverything)

A. Boogert - 17th century color theory

This isn’t a very old ‘Then’, but even in just 26 years there have been a few changes in the framing and presentation of one of the Art Institute of Chicago's most well known works. 
1)They changed the frame! A subtle change, yes. But it’s interesting to see the curatorial decision to take away any remaining frills on the frame. Today, the frame is as simple as it gets. The only way to make it more minimal would be to make it smaller - maybe that’s a change we’ll see in the next couple decades.
2) Added rope barriers. No, it’s not the same protection you’ll see at the Mona Lisa, but those little rope barricades are an indication of tighter security and protection on some of the museum’s most valued pieces.
3) Curatorial blurbs are now visible on either side of the work. This may not be something most museum goers notice, but where to place these little plaques is a difficult decision for most curators - do you place them close to the work and easier to find or farther away where they aren’t visually distracting?  There are many strong opinions on either side of the argument.
More info about the Seurat, here.

This isn’t a very old ‘Then’, but even in just 26 years there have been a few changes in the framing and presentation of one of the Art Institute of Chicago's most well known works. 

1)They changed the frame! A subtle change, yes. But it’s interesting to see the curatorial decision to take away any remaining frills on the frame. Today, the frame is as simple as it gets. The only way to make it more minimal would be to make it smaller - maybe that’s a change we’ll see in the next couple decades.

2) Added rope barriers. No, it’s not the same protection you’ll see at the Mona Lisa, but those little rope barricades are an indication of tighter security and protection on some of the museum’s most valued pieces.

3) Curatorial blurbs are now visible on either side of the work. This may not be something most museum goers notice, but where to place these little plaques is a difficult decision for most curators - do you place them close to the work and easier to find or farther away where they aren’t visually distracting?  There are many strong opinions on either side of the argument.

More info about the Seurat, here.

(Source: artistandframer)

Caillebotte’s Paris Street Rainy Day finally returns to the galleries after restoration in the conservation studio - The Art Institute of Chicago

Gustav Caillebotte - artist and patron

Self portrait at the Easel, Oil on canvas, 1879

Self portrait, Oil on canvas, 1889

Restlessly energetic, always seeking focus, he trained as an engineer, earned a law degree, and fought in the Franco-Prussian war. It was only in the early 1870s that he decided to become an artist. He enrolled at the École des Beaux-Arts, studied with academic gurus like Jean-Léon Gérôme, but soon left. Largely self-taught he moved back and forth between Paris and the family estate in the village of Yerres, painting what he found.

Caillebotte went about painting in the orthodox academic way, which was also an engineer’s way, with the aid of preliminary drawings and oil sketches, a labor-intensive method that the artists who would come to be called Impressionists were leaving behind in favor of spontaneity. The Impressionists were a marginal phenomenon when Caillebotte became aware of them but a modern one, which is what he needed to know.

He visited the first Impressionist salon in 1874. When the second one took place two years later, the artists involved, including Monet, Renoir, Sisley, Cézanne andDegas, welcomed his participation.

He repaid their hospitality with patronage. He organized exhibitions for them, promoted their careers, paid their rent (Monet survived on his generosity for years) and bought their paintings, amazing things, out of the studio. He bequeathed his collection to the French government, with the stipulation that it be put on public view. Part of it became the foundation of what is now the Musée d’Orsay. 

Read more

See more paintings by Caillebotte HERE

See the restoration of Paris Rainy Day HERE

greatartinuglyrooms:

Paul Gauguin
ROME (AP) — A Paul Gauguin still life stolen decades ago has been recovered after hanging for 40 years in a Sicilian autoworker’s kitchen. More: nyti.ms/PniAkA

greatartinuglyrooms:

Paul Gauguin

ROME (AP) — A Paul Gauguin still life stolen decades ago has been recovered after hanging for 40 years in a Sicilian autoworker’s kitchen. More: nyti.ms/PniAkA

I recently saw The Monuments Men, and I, like many other art nerds out there, loved seeing history from this perspective. It’s so nice to see the efforts and successes of the soldiers who went to war for the art.

It also reminded me of THIS POST from a while ago of photos by Pierre Jahan of French artwork being returned to the Louvre after WWII

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864 - 1901)

I have tried to do what is true and not ideal.”

See works by Toulouse-Lautrec HERE